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Spanish Open dictionary by furoya



furoya
  14605

 ValuePosition
Position99
Accepted meanings146059
Obtained votes7653
Votes by meaning0.018
Inquiries3929529
Queries by meaning278
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Meanings sorted by:

poliandria
  1

A type of polygamy in which the wife has more than one husband. It has a Greek origin by 960; 959; 955; 965; 962; (polys "many") 945; 957; 948; 961; 959; 962; ( Andrós "adult male" ) . The term is used in botany for flowers with many stamens.

  
poliginia
  1

A type of polygamy in which the man has more than one wife. It has a Greek origin by 960; 959; 955; 965; 962; (polys "many") 947; 965; 957; 951; (gyné, "woman, wife"). The term is used in zoology for the male with many females, or in botany for flowers with many pistils.

  
poligamia
  1

1. A form of marriage in which one of the partners may have more than one spouse. From Greek 960; 959; 955; 965; 962; (polys "many") 947; 945; 956; 949; 969; (gameo "to marry") - 953; 945; ( -ia "action, quality") . See polyandry, polygyny, monogamy. By extension, it is also used for zoological and botanical relationships and reproduction.

  
monogamia
  1

A form of marriage (or animal partnership) in which each partner may not have more than one spouse. From Greek 956; 959; 957; 959; ( monkey "only, unique" ) 947; 945; 956; 949; 969; (gameo "to marry") - 953; 945; ( -ia "action, quality") .

  
fotograma
  1

It is each of the frames that make up a film and when projected successively they create the illusion of animation. It is a word with Greek etymology for 966; 969; 962; , 966; 969; 964; 959; 962; (phoos, pootós "light, of light") 947; 961; 945; 956; 956; 945; (gramma "drawing, letter") .

  
kinetoscopio
  1

A precursor machine to cinematographic projectors whose animations were viewed on a single screen. The name is taken from the Greek 954; 953; 957; 951; 963; 953; 962; (kinesis "movement") 963; 954; 959; 960; 949; 953; 957; (scopein "observe"). See nickelodeon.

  
cinematógrafo
  1

1º_ Apparatus that projects or films films. From Greek 954; 8055; 957; 951; 956; 945; 964; 959; 962; ( kinematos "of movement" ) 954; 953; 957; 951; 956; 945; 964; 959; 962; ( Grafein "Record, Write" ) . 2º_ Also the projection room, even when the origin is not in film but in video.

  
zoopraxiscopio
  1

It is a precursor of the cinematographic projectors created in 1879 by Eadweard Muybridge (pseudonym of the photographer Edward James Muggeridge) that initially served to settle an argument between American tycoons about the trotting of horses: Leland Stanford said that at some point the animal had its four legs in the air and his friend James Keene that he always trotted with at least one hoof on the ground. Using an ingenious mechanism of sequenced cameras, Muybridge photographed a galloping horse and stitched the shots together on a glass disc that he spun in front of a lamp, thus projecting an animation where Stanford could be seen to be right. This method was used with other animals for its study and the invention was called 'zoopraxiscope', from the Greek 950; 969; 959; 957; (zoon "living being, animal") 960; 961; 945; 958; 953; 962; (praxis "action, movement") 963; 954; 959; 960; 949; 953; 957; (scopein "observe"). See kinetoscope, nickelodeon.

  
amorismo
  1

It is a neologism that does not yet have a definition assigned to it, because it lends itself to various interpretations. It clearly refers to some kind of 'love' by adding the suffix -ism, which denotes a militancy or a philosophical stance, but they also associate it with a suffering of 'toxic love', a deformation, transformation or evolution between different degrees of affection, or even a contraction of love and selfishness.

  
ojímetro
  1

Irony by "calculation by eye, according to personal criteria". It names a supposed measuring instrument using the suffix -meter, but attached to 'eye', as the only tool used and which of course lacks precision.

  
tokenización
  1

It is a Spanish version of the English neologism tokenization, which can be used in our language because the word token already circulates in many environments, although with various interpretations. In principle, it would be the "effect of tokenizing, converting or giving symbol value to something or someone" that is used in sociology, especially for cases in which a merely formal or decorative position, position or category is given, just to show that it is taken into account and on many occasions for a matter of image. such as when it comes to including representatives of a minority or a traditionally discriminated group. It is precisely for this last reason that there is an ironic equivalent as "florism" (or "tokenism"). However, there are other, more technical uses, such as converting data to a token (information that represents data but does not contain in itself any meaning that relates to the original), and it is an alternative to encryption.

  
cultileído
  1

It is a neologism that unites the words cultured and read for the cultured person and at the same time reader, although it is also used as a mockery or irony for those who presume it.

  
aptrónimo
  1

It is a neologism for a person's surname or first name that has some relation to their appearance, their occupation, their history. Sometimes it appears as 'aptonym', or its interpretation 'characteronym', although in Spanish there is already 'ipsónimo' which has a broader meaning but perfectly includes proper nouns. The origin is in the English aptronym, a play on the word patronym ("patronymic") with apt ("fit, with aptitude for something"). See inaptronym .

  
fusilánime
  1

Humorous neologism invented by Marcos Mundstock for the play "The Commission. ( Hymns ) " (Les Luthiers, 1996). It means "cowardly or faint-hearted for fear of being shot."

  
payasofía
  1

It is a neologism coming from the group of Payamédicos , where they unite clown ("artist who makes a humorous act") with philosophy, using their apheresis "sophia". It is a way of facing life not only through humour and health care, but also with tolerance, respect for others and resilience.

  
fungólogo
  1

I don't know if this word really has a use, because there is mycologist, which etymologically is more appropriate for "who studies fungi". Still, this Greco-Latin pastiche is not an absurdity either, since the Latin fungus, i means "mushroom" and the Greek 955; 959; 947; 959; 962; (logos) indicates a "relationship or theme".

  
cuadriga
  2

It was a type of Roman chariot, widely used in competitions. The name is obviously Latin, for a reduction of quadrijugus, to, um ("yoke for four animals"), because it was for only four horses. See charioteer, biga, triga.

  
triga
  2

1º_ Acronym for Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics. It was a type of Roman chariot, widely used in competitions. The name is obviously Latin, for a reduction of trijugus, to, um ("yoke for three animals"), because it was for only three horses. See charioteer, biga, charioteer.

  
biga
  2

1º_ Type of bread preference, of Italian origin. It was also the name of a Roman chariot, much used in competitions. It is obviously Latin, for a reduction of bijugus, to, um ("yoke for two animals"), because it was for only two horses. See beam, charioteer, triga, charioteer.

  
auriga
  2

In ancient Rome it was the one who drove a chariot drawn by horses or mules. Today it is used figuratively for any carriage driver. The origin is in the Latin auriga, probably the union of aurea, ae ("bridle or bridle of the horse") ago, is, ere, um ("to direct"). See biga, triga, chariot.

  






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